Another Entrepreneurship Project of the  Whitman School of Management at Syracuse University

A New Year, A New You: Elevate Your Confidence

It’s a new year—a time where people (and businesses) make resolutions and set goals. Rather than investigating the nature of resolutions (been there, done that), what if instead you tried elevating your personal or professional confidence?

In an article on Entrepreneur.com, contributor Graham Young, a performance strategist who simplifies the science behind human achievement, explains some simple steps to help you begin to eliminate your insecurities and elevate your confidence:

Stop comparing other people’s strengths to your weaknesses: People have a tendency to create a vulnerable identity when entering social settings, which can lead to the habit of identifying how good others are at things, and how we personally don’t match up. From public speaking to leadership skills, over time this process trains your brain to disregard your own strengths and can put you in a reactive mental state that causes stress and can decrease performance. Start appreciating other people’s strengths—rather than seeing it as competition, consider it an opportunity to think about how you can develop/grow your own skills.

Caring about what people think about you is good—worrying is pointless: People tend to rely on others to determine their personal value and self-worth. If you are generally interested in others and treat them with respect, there isn’t much more you can do in that moment—be confident that you put your best foot forward. If that person doesn’t see that, it’s time to move one. Focus on making your intent honest and treat every the same way you want to be treated.

You think people know more about you than they actually do: If you’re insecure about something, changes are you have spent a lot of time thinking about that particular thing—by being on high alert all the time, your brain becomes hyper sensitive to everything and tries to protect you. Over time, you may think that others can see your lack of confidence, too—but reassure yourself that no one knows.

Confidence comes from action, not outcome: As Young states, “The first step to personal change is awareness.” As you’re now able to identify these thought patterns, you can now start to take action! Try not to rely on the outcomes of situations or reactions of others to determine if you feel good (or not). Train your brain to feel confident without needing to see the result first!

When beliefs about our own abilities are limiting, they can begin to consume our mind and could eventually turn into an insecurity and negative feelings. In this new year, take these steps to boost your confidence can keep striving for success and to be the best person you can be!

For the full article, visit: http://www.entrepreneur.com/article/253898.

Thanks for reading, and until next time… stay WISE!

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